• concussion-which-sports

    Fast Facts

    • A concussion is a brain injury and all are serious.
    • Most concussions occur without loss of consciousness.
    • Recognition and proper response to concussions when they first occur can help prevent further injury or even death.

    What is a Concussion?

    A concussion is a type of traumatic brain injury, or TBI, caused by a bump, blow, or jolt to the head that can change the way your brain normally works. Concussions can also occur from a blow to the body that causes the head to move rapidly back and forth. Even a “ding,” “getting your bell rung,” or what seems to be mild bump or blow to the head can be serious.

    Concussions can occur in any sport or recreation activity. So, all coaches, parents, and athletes need to learn concussion signs and symptoms and what to do if a concussion occurs.

    Originally Posted: http://www.cdc.gov/concussion/sports/index.html

  • The leading causes of TBI are:

    • Falls (35.2%);
    • Motor vehicle – traffic (17.3%);
    • Struck by/against events (16.5%); and
    • Assaults (10%).1

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  • signs-symptoms-concussion

    Most people with a concussion recover quickly and fully. But for some people, symptoms can last for days, weeks, or longer. In general, recovery may be slower among older adults, young children, and teens. Those who have had a concussion in the past are also at risk of having another one and may find that it takes longer to recover if they have another concussion.

    Symptoms of concussion usually fall into four categories:

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  • sports-concussion

    If you suspect that an athlete has a concussion, implement your 4-step action plan:

    Step 1: Remove the athlete from play.

    Look for signs and symptoms of a concussion if your athlete has experienced a bump or blow to the head or body. When in doubt, keep the athlete out of play.

     

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  • signs-of-concussion

    To help recognize a concussion, you should watch for the following two things among your athletes:

    • A forceful bump, blow, or jolt to the head or body that results in rapid movement of the head.

    AND

    • Any change in the athlete’s behavior, thinking, or physical functioning.

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